“Clamity Kate”

Our daughter, Kate, came into town to spend a few weeks with us. So we went to the coast (Ocean Shores/Moclips) for the Easter weekend. It was a great time as along the way we visited a cat breeder (more on that later) and stayed in a house on the cliff overlooking the beach. Although we missed the chocolate festival, the kite festival and the Fireman’s Ball, we were there in perfect time for… the clamming season.

We’d never been clamming before but this wasn’t going to stop us. We went to purchase a clam gun – although we were very impressed with the gentleman selling very slick ones on the roadside, we figured we go with the cheaper version from the gas station. Armed with the clam gun, a net and a clamming license we were good to go for Easter morning. An early start ensured we were out on the beach before the low tide and before too many people showed up.

If you haven’t been clamming, there is an art to it. You need to watch as the water rolls out for little dimples in the sand which indicate the presence of a clam under the surface. You then quickly push the clam gun into the sound to cover the dimple and try to get it down far enough and then extract it to pull out a cylinder of sand with hopefully the clam inside the sand cylinder or exposed. It sounds easier that it really is, as there is significant suction that makes it difficult to lift the gun back out of the sand.

Kate tried her hand first. A few unsuccessful attempts, then Alice tried to no avail. I had more luck with a clam being exposed and then Kate was able to successfully extract two herself. Of course each time one was exposed, the girls squealed much to the amusement of the other clammers and I had to pull the clam out and toss it in the net.

WP_20150405_07_16_25_ProOnce we had three (the limit is fifteen each), we figured we had enough for breakfast, so we headed back to the beach house. After I cleaned them Kate cooked them up and both she and Alice declared them very tasty and a great way to spend Easter morning.

 

Moisture Festival

TrapeseThe Moisture Festival which is credited as the world’s largest Comedy/Varietè festival, running for four weeks every spring in Seattle, is now playing in Fremont and in Capitol Hill for the Burlesque.   Of course we had to go to the Burlesque. As interesting as the show itself were the volunteers helping to organize the event and the people in the audience. A great mixture of young and older, there were a number of people, mostly men, wearing rubber chickens on bead necklaces around their necks including a couple of fellows in kilts – I haven’t really figured that out and just put it down to the general wackiness of this area.

The event itself opened with a great jazz band followed by a variety of performers who sang, balanced, performed trapeze and risqué burlesque numbers. All in all a great evening’s entertainment and a great way to celebrate Spring.

Here is one of favorite performers – the one and only “Inga”.Inga

And of course, Alice’s favorite “Mr Gorgeous”.Mr Gorgeous

March of the Raccoons

Spring has definitely arrived in Seattle. The trees are blooming with flowers, the birds are singing, the Canadian geese are starting to appear on their way back north, Justin the beaver is splashing around in the mornings… and the raccoons are becoming more active.

Have you ever come face to face with a raccoon? With their face masks, beady eyes and shifty demeanor they certainly have a creepy aura. They travel in a pack (it could be a family) and seem to have no fear of people, bicyclists or vehicles. This morning on my way to the gym at 4:45am I had a staring match with one as he seemed to be daring me to walk by him on the Burke Gilman trail. I wasn’t about to be intimidated, so I set my sternest face and used hand gestures to show him I had my eyes on him. I will say I was quite pleased to be past him and safely across the street.

Raccoon(1)These raccoons seem to be getting more cheeky. Last week as I was leaving for work quite early in the morning, one was wandering down the dock. As I stepped onto the dock, he stopped, considered his options as I started walking towards him, and then thought better of continuing the standoff, as he turned around and headed back down the dock and then towards the exit. Of course the exit has a chain fence so there was no escaping there for him, but the sides have a lower wooden fence that is surrounded by bushes. He managed to scramble onto the wooden fence and buried his front-half into the bushes. As I walked by his rear end was still hanging out, but I managed to resist the temptation to slap it on my way past.

I’m hoping that as the weather continues to warm up and there is more activity around the dock, that the raccoons might become a little more timid and give us a little free space.

Welcome to my world!

WP_20140413_001 (2)I have the privilege and pleasure of living with my wife on a houseboat that is docked on Lake Union in the Fremont area of Seattle. This is such a wonderful experience and so I figured I should share this with others – hence this blog.

Living on a houseboat is definitely somewhat unique and Seattle is one of the few places where this type of lifestyle is actually possible. You may be wondering what houseboat living is like. Is it comfortable? Does it rock? Is it cold? Over the course of this blog, I hope to answer these questions and provide some additional insights into the experiences of houseboat living, Lake Union and the very interesting Fremont area.

First some information on our houseboat – ‘Alice’. It has two bedrooms, two bathrooms, a kitchen, dining room, lounge room, study and a pilot house with a day bed and stunning views. It really is very cozy and homely with lots of internal wood (floors, ceilings, trimmings). It also has two decks for outdoor living and a basement in the hull which provides a good amount of storage space.

‘Alice’ is next to the Lake Washington Rowing club as well as the Burke Gilman trail which provides a great opportunity to walk or ride a bike for up to 30 miles in very nice surroundings.